A Daniel Come To Judgement

There have been speculations about what Jesus wrote in the sand while the crowd awaited his response to the woman accused of adultery. Was it a list of the sins of the elders? Whatever. The time he took also cooled down the charged atmosphere, and created an air of anticipation – making it possible for the response that could be heard and understood by all. Similar pauses are used by orators before making an important point. To the silent and curious gathering Jesus quietly replies, “ Let anyone among you who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her”. The silence must have been palpable. To people expecting a straight forward rebuttal or agreement, this would be perplexing. This oblique parry and thrust were not expected. What could they say? How could they hide their own hypocrisy? In shame they withdraw, led by their elders.

That is the first moral of the story. But, in it there is an allusion to a case in the Old Testament. Remembering how the Old Testament foreshadows things that are more fully revealed in the New Testament, let’s stretch the string to the story in the Book of Daniel, where elders (Judges), accuse and sentence the beautiful Susanna to be stoned. The Judges were the custodians and interpreters of the Lord’s covenant. Yet blinded by lust they seek the death of one of their own daughters. What may have started as a benign diversion, soon took over and clouded rational thinking. From the admiration of a beautiful woman their thoughts drift to covetousness, and deeper to lust and adultery. Then lying and bearing false witness seemed natural. Eventually, they scheme to kill an innocent person. The elders, misused their authority as judges; till they themselves became the judged.

From the nervous isolated woman Jesus adds a further lesson. He places himself, not as a judge but along with those sinners who did not condemn her. Justice had been done. But, Jesus always has more. He goes on to tell her, “Go your way, and from now on do not sin again”. Jesus offers unctions not only for the sins committed, but also reassures her that she can be released from from the burden of guilt, if she listens to his word. Holistic curing. 

The Grain of Wheat


“ The hour has come

For the Son of Man to be glorified.

Very truly, I tell you, unless a grain of wheat falls into the earth and dies,

It remains just a single grain; 

But if it dies,It bears much fruit.” John12: 20 – 33


Reflecting on the passage, Laurin J Wenig*, says, “The grain of wheat must sacrifice its existence as a seed if it is to become a new shaft of wheat, a new form of life. God calls us again and again to sacrifice, to die to ourselves, in order to come alive to others, to produce much fruit.”

The season of lent is a period for dying into ourselves, to break with the status quo, taking chances to lay bare our weaknesses to be transformed by grace. Unless we undergo change we cannot fully enter the dawn at Easter. 

Like the Son we must divest ourselves of all earthly attachments. On Calvary they stripped Him of human vestiture; mocked Him to deprive Him of dignity; Crucified Him and drained all His blood. Then, He who took no home or bed for rest, was laid in a stranger’s tomb. He entered the final darkness of earthly death. He surrendered Himself with complete helplessness: one cannot imagine the physical pain and abandonment that Jesus suffered. When done, He said “It is finished”. 

All this for what? To be a mockery to the gentiles and a stumbling block to those He came to “save”. Why Lord, was it necessary to undergo this humiliation and suffering? Was it for me? But, I am not worthy that you should come down to me and enter under my roof – a mere spec of dust in the vast expanse of an ever expanding universe. Yet you love me enough to suffer such torment for me. You wish only a humble and contrite heart in return. In your ultimate act of sacrifice and obedience you joyfully accepted the “Cup”, The Father had set before you. Lord, can I not do as much and share in my cup your own extreme sacrifice – fulfilling my Baptismal charism, and acceptance by The Father, as your brother.

*  “Forty Days of Grace, Lenten Prayers and reflections”, Lauren J Wenig, Twenty-Third Publications.

The Power Of The Word


Why the hurry,

Noble Roman?

Why the strident steps among excitement?

What word have you heard

That revives primal times, 

When it raced in silence over chaos,

Creating all?

Have we not heard it all?

Maybe the humdrum of daily chores

Within the chaos of mending, bending and erecting,

Distractions and some useful things;

Hustle and bustle shutting out whisperings of immortality. 

You heard, you came,

You beseeched and returned a believer,

Turning a millennia of obsequious obedience on its head; 

A tyrant’s brow humble in humility – 

Just for a servant’s sake.

Orders used to being obeyed, obey  

The word of a vassal of no fixed address.

Accepting the authority of the word 

You changed the system

That built empires and successful successions and accessions. 

Immortalised, your words resonate

Among those who accept the word with due diligence.